Flying » Fractional Jet Ownership

October 1, 2011
Each of the major companies in the fractional-share business claims to be number one at something, the point being that it is the smartest choice for you. We investigated some of these claims–all of which we found on the providers' Web sites–to see how well they stand up to scrutiny.
August 1, 2011
Zaher Deir, managing director of jet connections, claimed its program will ma
Perhaps you like everything about ­fractional ownership except the ownership part. You want to be able to count on having the same model aircraft for every flight and the idea of sharing expenses with others appeals to you. But maybe you can't come up with the cash to purchase a fractional share or can't use the tax benefits that accompany ownership.
June 1, 2011
Small operators don’t have as many resources as the big-four providers to hel
You're probably familiar with the four operators that dominate the fractional-jet-share business: CitationAir, Flexjet, Flight Options and–the biggest of the big, with more than half the market–NetJets. But if you're shopping for a share, those aren't your only choices.
May 31, 2011
You're probably familiar with the four operators that dominate the fractional-jet-share business: CitationAir, Flexjet, Flight Options and–the biggest of the big, with more than half the market–NetJets. But if you're shopping for a share, those aren't your only choices.
February 1, 2011
“Fractional is slightly more than 50 percent of our business,” said Citationa
Not long ago, the idea of selling fractional shares in business jets looked like a winner. Industry pioneer NetJets-which Warren Buffett had acquired for Berkshire Hathaway in 1998-appeared prosperous, and so did the several other companies that had formed to take advantage of the business model.
December 1, 2010
Providers generally charge a minimum of 60 minutes per flight. So If all your
If you're new to the world of fractional shares, you may well be confused about how these deals work and about the terminology you're hearing. Here are the answers to some frequently asked questions. How did the fractional-share concept get started?
August 1, 2010
Leasing might make sense if you can't take advantage of the tax-depreciation
You've analyzed numerous variables, including where, when and how often you fly. You've determined that a fractional share makes sense for you and figured out which aircraft model best suits your needs. You've even picked a fractional provider. Time to call the company, sign the paperwork and break out the margaritas?
June 1, 2010
Kenn Ricci, who founded Flight Options and left the company in 2003, returned
When industry observers speculate about the future of the four biggest fractional-jet-share providers, the company that often prompts the most discussion is Flight Options. That's because it has arguably undergone more change than its competitors while also lacking the protection afforded by being under a large corporate umbrella.
February 1, 2010
If you want to fly on designated “peak travel days,” you have to give your pr
A chief selling point of fractional flying is its simplicity. Unlike charter customers, you don't have to bother with shopping for a flight; and unlike full owners, you don't have to worry about maintenance, storage and hiring crews. The fractional provider takes care of all that.
December 1, 2009
AMERICA'S ECONOMIC DOWNTURN has dealt a crippling blow to the fractional-share industry. Rapidly declining used-aircraft prices and fewer flying hours over the past year have forced fractional operators to defer aircraft deliveries, cut staff and explore new ways to keep flying.

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Quote/Unquote

“When you get into the larger aircraft it becomes like a hotel, with dozens of staff supporting the plane based in a galley area down below. You have very comprehensive cooking facilities, and on larger aircraft we have looked at theatres, with spiral staircases and a Steinway grand piano. The limitations for what you can put inside a plane are pretty much the limits of physics, and even money cannot always overcome that. Even so, people are still always trying to push [the limits]. ”

-Howard Guy of Design Q, a UK-based consultancy