People

November 30, 2011
Teddy Forstmann
Theodore Forstmann, the private equity investor credited with turning around Gulfstream Aerospace, died Nov. 20 at age 71. His investment firm, Forstmann Little & Company, acquired Gulfstream in 1990 for $800 million. When the Savannah, Ga.-based aircraft manufacturer began experiencing financial difficulties, Forstmann took a hands-on approach and appointed himself chairman and CEO.
October 1, 2011
Ester Dyson
After reading Esther Dyson's résumé, you might conjure up a Type A executive juggling urgent phone calls behind a massive desk. Dyson, after all, has spent decades–and earned millions–advising, buying and selling companies and shares of companies.
August 1, 2011
Haven't heard of Bobbi Brown? It's a good bet you're a man. I had no idea who she was until a month or so before I met her, but when I mentioned her name to our editorial director, she called Brown a "life-changing" figure and immediately pronounced her cover-worthy. Then I talked to my 12-year-old daughter, who said, "You're meeting Bobbi Brown?! In person?!"
June 1, 2011
You can say this for Donald Trump: He’s still standing. In fact, he’s flying–and getting ready to trade up from his gold-plated but aging Boeing 727-100 jet, which has two conference rooms, a master bedroom and seating for 24. His new ride: a Boeing 757-200 that’s about twice as big.
June 1, 2011
In a career that began more than 30 years ago and has included tournament wins on five continents, golf pro Nick Price has been the embodiment of the international player. Born in South Africa and raised in Zimbabwe, the now 53-year-old father of three started competing on the so-called Sunshine Tour in his native land in 1977.
June 1, 2011
 “I bought a beautiful 757,” Donald Trump told Business Jet Traveler in late April. “It’s being retroed and will be in service in about three or four weeks. It’s being completed by Stambaugh Aviation Inc.” Stambaugh is located at Brunswick-Golden Isles Airport, in Brunswick, Ga.
April 1, 2011
-ousted JetBlue founder David Neeleman, on why he named his new airline Azul, which is Portuguese for "blue"
April 1, 2011
“The CEO and President [at JetBlue]...should have known better. it’s ironic t
Like Richard Branson, who arrived late and left early when I interviewed him three years ago, JetBlue founder David Neeleman seems to be a man in a hurry. He showed up 20 minutes after the appointed time for our talk, exchanged brief hellos and ducked into his office to check e-mail.
April 1, 2011
“I was astonished at how much paperwork was involved to [buy my jet]. I had t
Until a few months ago, I had somehow overlooked Stuart Woods and his nearly four-dozen novels and two nonfiction books, many of which have appeared on the New York Times bestseller lists. But then while browsing in a library, I noticed the cover of Loitering with Intent and picked up the book.
February 1, 2011
Terry Vance said he simply couldn’t take care of business if he had to rely o
"Screw it, let's ride" was the ­position Harley-Davidson took when the economy tanked. So said ex-motorcycle drag racer and ­business jet owner Terry Vance, who thinks the cure for general aviation lethargy could be a page out of the motorcycle company's marketing playbook.

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““CEOs go to their vacation homes just after companies report favorable news, and CEOs return to headquarters right before subsequent news is released. More good news is released when CEOs are back at work, and CEOs appear not to leave headquarters at all if a firm has adverse news to disclose. When CEOs are away from the office, stock prices behave quietly with sharply lower volatility. Volatility increases immediately when CEOs return to work.” —David Yermack, a New York University finance professor, whose recently released study shows a correlation between when CEOs take their private jets on vacation and movements in their companies’ stock price ”

-David Yermack