Business Jet Traveler

August 31, 2015
Airforce One
The U.S. Air Force has tapped Boeing to supply a trio of 747-8 quad-engine jumbo jets to serve as the official presidential aircraft, aka Air Force One, at a cost of more than $1.6 billion.
August 31, 2015
It’s no wonder you don’t hear much negative talk about business aviation safety: there’s not much bad news to discuss. The safety record for private, charter and fractional business jets has long been by far the best of all of general aviation, which includes personal, training, sightseeing, utility and owner-flown turbine and non-turbine aircraft. Only the major airlines have a better long-term record. One reason is that they fly on regular schedules to the same destinations, so their pilots follow the same or similar routing, use the same airports and know what instructions to expect from air traffic controllers. Also, U.S. carriers operate under the most stringent federal aviation regulations. They must adhere to pilot duty-time limits and employ drug and alcohol testing, cockpit resource management, safety management systems and standard operations procedures.
August 30, 2015
ACJ350
Five and eight may be small numbers, but Airbus is betting they’ll represent a big difference for its new A350-900 XWB (extra wide body). The model is five inches wider and, claims the manufacturer, 8 percent more fuel-efficient than Boeing’s 787, with which it will compete in the long-haul, twinjet market. In 2018, Airbus expects to introduce a stretched version of the aircraft, the A350-1000, to go head-to-head with Boeing’s even larger 777 twinjet.
August 30, 2015
Hands holding piggy bank
How should you talk to your kids about money? All parents face the question of how to raise financially literate and responsible children, but affluent families encounter special challenges. The key is starting early—perhaps even as soon as when your child receives his first tooth-fairy dollars. One couple with a large auto-sector business decided to begin involving their elementary-school-aged children in financial decisions. They invited the kids to family meetings, which opened with Lego-car racing, then launched into philanthropy with a discussion of how the company contributed to society and how the children could participate. The kids decided to raise money for their favorite charity by hosting a barbecue and car wash and selling duct-tape purses and bookmarks that they made themselves.
August 20, 2015
The latest products for your aircraft can mean faster Internet connections…and clean dinnerware.
August 13, 2015
People boarding a aircraft
If you saw the final episode of Mad Men in May you’ll recall where the characters stood as the 1970s began: most were basically in the same rut, in a rapidly changing world. But one of them, at least, wound up with a new job, a leg up on the future and access to a business jet. Prominently, there was lost soul Don Draper, gazing tragically out to sea from a spiritual retreat on the California coast, sourly intoning “om om” with doe-eyed hippies while, evidently, he dreamt up nothing more groovy than a Coca-Cola commercial. Back on the East Coast, there was Don’s whiny ex-wife Betty dying of lung cancer; and that rascal Roger winding up with the ill-tempered Marie, mother of the mercurial Megan, Don’s other ex-wife. Stan and Peggy, now a couple, were still creating ads at McCann-Erickson.
August 9, 2015
Man in front of bee hives
At a growing number of big-city hotels, the buzz about locally produced food is now more literal: resident bees circling back to rooftop apiaries. Chefs who don protective suits and gloves tend the hives, whose honey has become a popular menu ingredient in restaurants merely floors below.
August 9, 2015
A wounded war vet and an inmate with a dog from Puppies Behind Bars.
Puppies Behind Bars trains prison inmates to raise service dogs.
July 27, 2015
Paul Anka at piano
The singer-songwriter—still going strong nearly 60 years after his first hit—discusses his craft, explains why he’ll never retire and recalls how a bizjet helped him fill a concert request from Vladimir Putin. Singer/songwriter Paul Anka admits that he may have been the unlikeliest of pop stars when he burst onto the musical stage in the 1950s. “I was short, stocky, had a big nose and was far from the mold of the matinee-idol type,” says the artist, who turned 74 in July. But what he may have lacked in looks, he made up in talent.
July 27, 2015
people on static
I’m delighted to report that this issue introduces two new columnists to Business Jet Traveler. You’re probably already familiar with Joe Sharkey, a BJT contributor since 2005, whose New York Times business travel column has reached millions of readers every week for the past 16 years. Joe was on assignment for us in 2006 when the Embraer Legacy 600 he was riding on collided with a Brazilian airliner and had to make an emergency landing in the Amazon. (Read his harrowing account of the accident here.) Joe’s first bimonthly column for BJT concerns the end of the Mad Men era and the beginning of the business jet age.

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Quote/Unquote

“The people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do. ”

-the late Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple, Inc.