Business Jet Traveler » April 2012

May 3, 2012
Where the ‘Unsinkable’ Titanic Sank
Looking for something unusual to do this summer? How about exploring the remains of the Titanic from an Mir submersible vehicle at 12,500 feet below sea level? Fifteen-day excursions will begin July 12, July 27 and August 6 and will include lectures and a ceremony to mark the 100th anniversary of the Titanic’s sinking.
April 30, 2012
Large-cabin jets at turboprop prices
In the upper Midwest, where I live, regional airlines are pulling out of small-airport markets just as fast as the Department of Transportation will allow. In the era of $100-a-barrel oil, not even government subsidies can make some of these routes profitable. Flying regional jets (RJs) on these short hauls, often at low, fuel-guzzling altitudes, just makes the bad economics worse.
April 26, 2012
The Golf Club at Briar's Creek
A languid, expansive quality pervades South Carolina Lowcountry marsh and it’s on display at the Golf Club at Briar’s Creek. The 900-acre property sits in the middle of classic Intracoastal wetlands, 18 miles southwest of downtown Charleston.
April 23, 2012
Flying on borrowed time
Perhaps you have access to a private jet through an owner you know. It seems like a great deal: the aircraft is available almost any time, you fly with the same crew the owner uses and you pay considerably less than standard charter rates.
April 20, 2012
It would not be a stretch to call this our innovation and imagination issue, but the more I think it over, the more I feel it is our tenacity issue.
April 20, 2012
Why ‘NextGen’ matters
The congressional logjam blocking long-term FAA funding in the U.S. appears to be broken. Perhaps the FAA can finally move ahead with the much-heralded “next generation” air-traffic-control program known as NextGen.
April 20, 2012
The perfect airplane
Like other lawsuits, most of the ones involving business jets are settled out of court. Every once in a while, though, a corporate jet case will not only reach a judge but produce a decision that shines a spotlight into some dark corner of business aviation. One such case is JDI Holdings, LLC v. Jet Management, Inc., et al., 732 F. Supp.
April 19, 2012
Bombardier's Learjet 85
This year, Bombardier will launch one of the most ambitious flight-test programs in business aviation history. The Learjet 85 is scheduled to enter service next year and as many as five conforming aircraft could make their first flights in the coming months.
April 9, 2012
Cheyanne II
The 1932 Piper Cub sold for $1,300 and embodied everything Bill Piper thought an airplane should be: affordable to own and operate, simple, rugged and fun to fly. You can land it in a short farm field, a small lake or a tiny patch of gravel in the middle of a river. For many a bush pilot today, the Piper Cub remains the ride of choice for these reasons. There’s no drama here.
April 2, 2012
Cabin Comforts
A year ago–or three or five, for that matter–it seemed as if ­private aircraft already offered just about every imaginable onboard luxury. Nevertheless, designers keep stretching their imaginations and, year after year, they deliver new products that can make your flights even more enjoyable than before.

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Quote/Unquote

““CEOs go to their vacation homes just after companies report favorable news, and CEOs return to headquarters right before subsequent news is released. More good news is released when CEOs are back at work, and CEOs appear not to leave headquarters at all if a firm has adverse news to disclose. When CEOs are away from the office, stock prices behave quietly with sharply lower volatility. Volatility increases immediately when CEOs return to work.” —David Yermack, a New York University finance professor, whose recently released study shows a correlation between when CEOs take their private jets on vacation and movements in their companies’ stock price ”

-David Yermack