Business Jet Traveler

April 1, 2007
“My employees really appreciate that we can transport them to a destination q
If a desire to see the world helped entice a young Hank Cintron to sign up for military service, it's a good bet that he wasn't disappointed. He joined the Army from an ROTC program at the University of Puerto Rico at age 21 in 1975, and by the time he retired as a lieutenant colonel two decades later, he had worked everywhere from Venezuela and Nicaragua to Germany and Kuwait.
April 1, 2007
Stand in a trout stream holding a fly rod for as many hours and days as the patience of your partner back home and the indulgence of your boss, employees or stockholders will permit. Sooner or later, you'll catch a spotted porpoise of a fish so improbably outsized for the shallow confines of the freshwater creek where it swims that you won't believe it.
April 1, 2007
Cessna’s Mustang VLJ has a claimed top speed of 340 knots.
Cessna was late to the very light jet party. When the company first announced the Citation Mustang, in 2002, it refused to call it a light jet. Cessna CEO Jack Pelton to this day refuses to label the airplane a VLJ and instead describes it as a "downward defense of the product line."
April 1, 2007
With enough power, you can make a barn door fly.
Ask a pilot what keeps an airplane in the sky and he'll most likely talk about the forces of lift, thrust, gravity and drag; power-to-weight ratios; and possibly "airfoils"-the word used to describe the wings' shape. Or maybe he'll answer simply, "Your credit card." Either way, it's not much comfort when you're eight miles above terra firma with no visible means of support.
April 1, 2007
In an ideal world, you'd have it all-a Wi-Fi Internet connection, e-mail access on your BlackBerry, four bars of signal strength on your cellphone and 200 channels of satellite television on a big, flat high-definition screen, all from the comfort of your seat in the cabin. In short, you'd have technologies that would make your time in the air more like your time on the ground.
April 1, 2007
“I’m very engaged, but I try to avoid bungee jumping into other managers’ bus
If 10 years ago you had peeked into the cockpit of almost any business aircraft or airliner in the world, you would have seen a large, boxy flight bag holding several thick leather binders with the words "Jeppesen Airway Manual" embossed on the cover.
April 1, 2007
Edwards’ and May’s 1971 Cessna Citation 500 boasts terrain-warning and global
While the average car winds up on the junk heap after about 13 years, the typical business jet has a much longer lifespan. In fact, at least a few are still flying after more than 40 years (see box below). One vintage jet we found is owned by Rick Edwards and Louis May of Little Rock, Ark., who are business partners and have been friends since childhood.
April 1, 2007
"I haven’t seen a bowling alley in an ACJ yet, but I’m sure the day is coming
Airbus followed Boeing into the prepackaged "bizliner" market in 1997. That's when it announced the Airbus Corporate Jet (ACJ), a then $35 million executive version of its A319 airliner. At first, ACJ sales were sluggish, while Boeing initially did well with its 737 airliner variant. Today, Boeing has sold more than 100 of its Boeing Business Jets (BBJs).
April 1, 2007
Bombardier has revamped its Skyjet International block charter program, unveiling the new Jet Member card. The company claims its terms make the program the most flexible block charter offering in the market.
April 1, 2007
Boeing Business Jets has introduced design proposals for an executive/VIP version of its new Boeing 787 Dreamliner. The size of the cabin-nearly 19 feet wide and 118 feet long-makes it possible to create "a beautiful environment...whether you are looking for a flying palace or a business office in the sky," said Boeing Business Jets president Steven Hill.

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Quote/Unquote

“I have an obligation to get you to your destination. You have an obligation to pay. What else is there? We don't need 24 pages of legalese.”

-VistaJet founder and chairman Thomas Flohr, on the company's unusually brief, easy-to-understand contracts