Business Jet Traveler

August 9, 2015
Man in front of bee hives
At a growing number of big-city hotels, the buzz about locally produced food is now more literal: resident bees circling back to rooftop apiaries. Chefs who don protective suits and gloves tend the hives, whose honey has become a popular menu ingredient in restaurants merely floors below.
August 9, 2015
A wounded war vet and an inmate with a dog from Puppies Behind Bars.
Puppies Behind Bars trains prison inmates to raise service dogs.
July 29, 2015
Barefoot, my pants legs rolled up to my knees, I survey the horizon of mud, sea, birds and crystal-blue skies before focusing on biologist Heike Niemann as she scoops tiny snails into a screened colander. “Living in these sand grains are more than 800 species,” she says.
July 27, 2015
Paul Anka at piano
The singer-songwriter—still going strong nearly 60 years after his first hit—discusses his craft, explains why he’ll never retire and recalls how a bizjet helped him fill a concert request from Vladimir Putin. Singer/songwriter Paul Anka admits that he may have been the unlikeliest of pop stars when he burst onto the musical stage in the 1950s. “I was short, stocky, had a big nose and was far from the mold of the matinee-idol type,” says the artist, who turned 74 in July. But what he may have lacked in looks, he made up in talent.
July 27, 2015
people on static
I’m delighted to report that this issue introduces two new columnists to Business Jet Traveler. You’re probably already familiar with Joe Sharkey, a BJT contributor since 2005, whose New York Times business travel column has reached millions of readers every week for the past 16 years. Joe was on assignment for us in 2006 when the Embraer Legacy 600 he was riding on collided with a Brazilian airliner and had to make an emergency landing in the Amazon. (Read his harrowing account of the accident here.) Joe’s first bimonthly column for BJT concerns the end of the Mad Men era and the beginning of the business jet age.
July 27, 2015
True airspeed indicator
My friend Hugh has a highly developed scientific mind, and when he sees something about aviation that piques his interest, he often calls me for details. One question—“How fast is it?”—seems as if it ought to be pretty simple, but my answers often leave him frustrated. How can speed be so complicated?
July 24, 2015
Two little girls with donations
BJT readers—who represent one of the highest-net-worth magazine audiences anywhere—clearly have the means to contribute to a better world. To help you do that, we're spotlighting one deserving organization per issue. All of them have received a four-star overall rating from Charity Navigator, which evaluates philanthropic institutions based on their finances, accountability and transparency.
July 19, 2015
Though it failed commercially, the Starship paved the way for more advanced composite aircraft.
These days, everyone in the aviation field talks about composite aircraft. Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner is made mostly of carbon fiber composites, and the percentage of composite content in new business jet designs is on the rise. Over time, carbon fiber may, indeed, replace metal as the material of choice for aircraft. But how did we get here?
July 5, 2015
Buyers who face long waits for a new airplane may consider leasing on a short-term basis. (Illustration: John Lewis)
An aircraft buyer waiting for delivery of his new Gulfstream G650 once complained that the manufacturer “wasn’t promoting instant gratification.” Who could blame him? The scheduled delivery was eight years away. With a wait like that if you don’t have another aircraft that you don’t mind flying for the better part of a decade, you might as well buy one to tide you over.
July 1, 2015
Chris Burch, founder and CEO of Burch Creative Capital
He sold sweaters door-to-door to fellow students at Ithaca College. That turned out to be his first step on the road to becoming a billionaire.




“Time is our most precious commodity, and there are conveniences that wealth brings to essentially get you more time. —retired Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, explaining why he commutes via private jet from his Seattle home to watch games of the Los Angeles Clippers, the basketball team he bought last year for $2 billion. ”

-retired Microsoft CEO Steve Balmer