Business Jet Traveler

November 22, 2015
“How about celebrating New Year’s Eve in Australia?” suggested my advisor. “Then you fly back across the  International Date Line and celebrate again, in Hawaii.”(Illustration: John C. Lewis)
A woman behind me muttered wearily, “If I had a million dollars, I’d never get on an airliner again.” As she spoke, holiday music was playing somewhere in the departure lounge, and I began daydreaming. If I had an extra million dollars, I thought, I’d have a Christmas wish list involving air travel, but none of it would be on an airliner.
November 22, 2015
The cofounder of Paul Mitchell Systems, the hair-care products company, grew up poor and has been homeless twice. Today he’s a billionaire who owns three business jets.
November 12, 2015
You can dine indoors or out at Santiago, Chile’s D.O. Restorán, whose menu reports the source of every fish, piece of meat and vegetable. (PHOTO: Diego Varas)
D.O. Restorán, the initials stand for for “designation of origin”—is the brainchild of one of Chile’s most acclaimed chefs, Juan Morales.
November 12, 2015
Young, dynamic vintners are producing a wide variety of wines throughout Chile. Some of them rival or surpass anything you’ll find in the U.S. (Photo: Bob Ecker)
On a recent visit to Chile, I sampled many wines, tasted up-and-coming varietals and met a host of young, dynamic vintners.
November 12, 2015
Lilly Library (Photo: Kimberly Button)
Imagine being able to wander through a museum with no glass barriers, freely touching the historical pieces. Special-collection libraries let you do just that with unprecedented access to not only books and papers, but also rare memorabilia, audio recordings and more. Here are some of our favorites.
November 12, 2015
Jennifer Leach English (Photo: Ian Whelan)
John Paul DeJoria is as well known for his philanthropy as he is for selling shampoo. In his BJT interview with Cynthia Bowman (see page 14), the cofounder of the Paul Mitchell hair-care-products line tells a moving story about his mother teaching him and his brother early on that “success unshared is failure.” DeJoria learned the lesson well and today works with many charitable organizations, including his own JP’s Peace, Love and Happiness Foundation.
November 4, 2015
crowd at auction
Last August at Bonhams’s classic-car auction during the Pebble Beach Concours d’ Elegance in Monterey, California, the first two autos sold uneventfully. But Lot No. 3—a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO, one of only 39 made—was another story. The gavel of Bonhams chairman Robert Brooks started the bidding at $10 million, a huge jump from the $1.5 million that the last 250 GTO sold for 27 years ago. And higher bids kept coming, just as fast as Brooks could point at the would-be buyers. In just 11 minutes, the sale ended with an unnamed Ferrari aficionado winning the car for $38.1 million. It became the most expensive auto ever sold at auction and it ripped my heart out because, in 1970, I had turned down an identical 250 GTO for $6,000. That very car just sold privately for $52 million.
November 2, 2015
Gulfstream GVB on the runway.  Photo: Mariano Roselas
Should an aircraft appraiser be on your transaction team? Brokers typically play the role of appraiser, using their knowledge of the marketplace to set or counter an airplane’s price. But today, with the collapse of historical pricing models, the dearth of sales and the intensely private nature of the transactions, establishing an aircraft’s value is difficult.
October 24, 2015
Flowriding at Westin Kierland (PHOTO: KIM ROSENLOF)
As interest in endurance events continues to grow among high-end travelers, many resorts are expanding their wellness programs to provide professional coaching in running, swimming, triathlon and other forms of fitness.
October 24, 2015
Photo: Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce
Heading for the Rockies this winter for a deep-powder skiing adventure? Consider the Tetons in Wyoming, with their 500 inches of dry, pristine powder and breathtaking alpenglow sunrises and sunsets.




““CEOs go to their vacation homes just after companies report favorable news, and CEOs return to headquarters right before subsequent news is released. More good news is released when CEOs are back at work, and CEOs appear not to leave headquarters at all if a firm has adverse news to disclose. When CEOs are away from the office, stock prices behave quietly with sharply lower volatility. Volatility increases immediately when CEOs return to work.” —David Yermack, a New York University finance professor, whose recently released study shows a correlation between when CEOs take their private jets on vacation and movements in their companies’ stock price ”

-David Yermack