Money

February 1, 2011
Supposed stimulants for asset purchases based on tax breaks often have little
The good news about business aircraft financing today is that the money is back. One of the first consequences of the 2008 Wall Street meltdown was that capital disappeared faster than free beer. Many aircraft lenders still proclaimed that they were "ready to do deals," but often they lacked the financial horsepower to deliver on that promise.
February 1, 2011
Because the used-aircraft market enjoyed a robust fourth quarter in 2010, you might expect the current year to witness at least a slow and steady uptick in transactions. That could well be what happens, but keep in mind that fourth-quarter activity is often upbeat-2008 being a key exception-and that this market's future depends heavily on what happens with the overall economy. 
February 1, 2011
If you're in the market for a new business aircraft, the time to buy could be now. The reason is the bipartisan Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization and Job Creation Act of 2010, which became law on December 17. The Act includes 100-percent expensing for tax purposes of investments in capital assets, such as business aircraft, purchased between Sept. 8, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2011.
November 30, 2010
The FAA’s move sent a wave of panic through the business jet industry, partly
Not everyone can register an aircraft in the U.S. For starters, in most cases you have to be a U.S. citizen, as defined by federal statutes and FAA regulations. Under applicable statutes and FAA rules, a corporation isn't considered a U.S. citizen unless its president, two-thirds of its board of directors, two-thirds of its "managing officers" and three-quarters of its owners are U.S.
November 8, 2010
We'll remember 2010 as a year when bargain hunters snapped up business aircraft at prices that left some sellers with a sense of disbelief.
October 1, 2010
If you fly only 100 hours per year, don't expect owning your own jet to be co
ELSEWHERE IN THIS ISSUE, YOU'LL FIND PLENTY of discussion about the tangible and intangible benefits of using business aviation, but what about the expenses? Nobody ever said flying privately is cheap, but the good news is that it can be less costly than you might think-if you take steps to minimize expenses.
October 1, 2010
Today I dusted off a book that I've had for 45 years: Air Navigation, Department of the Air Force. Flipping through the book-which was a gift from an Air Force navigator, the father of one of my Cub Scout buddies-always stirs up memories. One concerns the time my buddy, Richie, and I submitted unsolicited pencil-sketch proposals for fighter jets to the Kennedy Administration.
August 1, 2010
Wall Streeters and other experts have been making a variety of persuasive but conflicting predictions about where the economy is headed. Will a recovery be shaped like a V? Or a U? Or perhaps a W? One expert even suggested an L-shaped condition, in which a nosedive would be followed by an indefinite period where we skid sideways along the bottom.
August 1, 2010
Opportunities to mitigate IRS or SEC difficulties by paying for non-business
One of the biggest challenges posed by FAA regulations is how to pay for a flight on a non-commercial aircraft.
July 1, 2010
Business jet finance probably hit bottom in early 2009. Loans have become much more available since then, but we've yet to return to the halcyon days of 2007, when you could readily arrange 100 percent financing for aircraft at purchase prices that today seem grossly inflated. As Bank of America's Michael Amalfitano pointed out, "The days of aggressive deals at thin pricing are over."

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Quote/Unquote

“When you get into the larger aircraft it becomes like a hotel, with dozens of staff supporting the plane based in a galley area down below. You have very comprehensive cooking facilities, and on larger aircraft we have looked at theatres, with spiral staircases and a Steinway grand piano. The limitations for what you can put inside a plane are pretty much the limits of physics, and even money cannot always overcome that. Even so, people are still always trying to push [the limits]. ”

-Howard Guy of Design Q, a UK-based consultancy