Business Jet Traveler » June 2007

June 1, 2007
A key advantage of owning an airplane is that it becomes an extension of your home. You can fill the cabin with all sorts of creature comforts, such as your daughter's favorite teddy bear or your son's video games. The cabin might also be host to one or more actual creatures, such as the prize Papillon dog your wife carries around in her large pink purse.
June 1, 2007
At a dinner party recently, the subject turned to private jets and someone asked, "If you could have any jet, which would you pick?" Someone else blurted out, "an F-16," and everyone laughed. If you think about it, an F-16 might well give you a decided advantage over business rivals, but it would likely also raise a few concerns.
June 1, 2007
Aircraft services and systems integrator Emteq has received a contract from Hawker Beechcraft for installation of the New Berlin, Wis. firm's new FAA-certified seat heaters in the Wichita aircraft manufacturer's King Airs. Plans exist to introduce similar seat heaters into Hawker business jets, as well as Beechcraft Baron and Bonanza models, according to Emteq president Jerry Jendusa.
June 1, 2007
It took less than a minute for a Sam’s Club customer shopping online to snap
Shoppers at Sam's Club, the warehouse chain owned by Wal-Mart, tend to load up their carts with bargain-priced consumables like potato chips and toilet paper as well as flat-panel TVs and computers. Recently, though, one buyer made a somewhat larger purchase from the club: a Cessna Citation Mustang jet.
June 1, 2007
The Federal Communications Commission, still concerned about whether cellphone calls by aircraft passengers would interfere with the ground-based cell system, has dropped a longstanding proposal to relax the current ban. But this may not be the end of the story.

Pages

 

Quote/Unquote

““CEOs go to their vacation homes just after companies report favorable news, and CEOs return to headquarters right before subsequent news is released. More good news is released when CEOs are back at work, and CEOs appear not to leave headquarters at all if a firm has adverse news to disclose. When CEOs are away from the office, stock prices behave quietly with sharply lower volatility. Volatility increases immediately when CEOs return to work.” —David Yermack, a New York University finance professor, whose recently released study shows a correlation between when CEOs take their private jets on vacation and movements in their companies’ stock price ”

-David Yermack