Business Jet Traveler » June 2007

June 1, 2007
While few general aviation flights currently land or take off at Washington N
It took four years after the 9/11 attacks for the Department of Homeland Security to reopen Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport to general aviation traffic. These days, though, flying a business jet into the heart of the nation's capital is easier than you might think.
June 1, 2007
Eos Airlines has expanded its all-business-class New York/ London scheduled service to three flights on weekly peak travel days. The total of 32 flights a week between the two cities includes a third flight from New York's JFK Airport on Sundays, Thursdays and Fridays and a third flight from London Stansted Airport on Sundays, Mondays and Fridays.
June 1, 2007
“When we first started growing, even our board was hesitant to believe that w
When Steve Hankin left Starwood Hotels & Resorts to become CEO of Sentient Jet three years ago, the Weymouth, Mass.-based jet-card provider was "a very small company," he said recently. It's bigger now, but exactly how much bigger is anybody's guess. As Hankin told us when we asked about revenues and hours flown, "We've never revealed that.
June 1, 2007
National Business Aviation Association president and CEO Ed Bolen is urging the association's members to protest what he calls a "sweetheart deal" for the airlines that would increase user fees for general aviation.
June 1, 2007
Gulfstream introduced the aerodynamically advanced G550 in 2003. Its cabin is
The $47.95 million Gulfstream G550 mates the latest bells and whistles to an airframe-engine combination that can deliver eight passengers and a crew of four to destinations up to 6,750 nautical miles away. That's Tokyo to Palm Beach nonstop in 12.5 hours, with reserves.

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Quote/Unquote

““Corporate executives should be your core business . . . You need [account executives who are] comfortable with the kind of boardroom leaders that see Learjet as a tool, not a frivolous extravagance for movie stars and their pets.” ”

-Advertising executive Pete Campbell to a Learjet executive on the penultimate episode of TV's Mad Men series, set in 1970.