Money

September 1, 2014
One of the most pervasive myths about the taxation of business jets in the U.S. is that the owner isn’t entitled to any deductions unless more than 50 percent of the aircraft’s usage is in a trade or business. I hear this regularly from people who are contemplating a jet acquisition but worry that they won’t be able to take any tax deductions for it because less than half the usage will be business-related. Like many myths, this one contains a nugget of truth, as I’ll explain presently. But it’s incorrect to assume you can’t write off anything if your business use doesn’t exceed 50 percent.
August 10, 2014
Your aircraft represents a wonderful business tool but also one of your largest potential exposures to catastrophic loss—one that could wipe out what you have spent years building. The importance of properly insuring against such loss should be obvious. Here’s a look at the most critical coverage types and clauses.
July 10, 2014
Dassault Falcon 7X
As soon as its first owner departs from the manufacturer’s delivery center, a new airplane technically becomes used (or preowned). For various reasons, however, 10 years after an aircraft’s final production date is generally considered the ­milestone separating “newer” used business aircraft from “older” ones.
July 8, 2014
Business jet static display. Photo: David McIntosh
Industry experts continue to blame lack of financing for the failure of business jet orders and sales to recover more rapidly since 2008. “Many sales are lost because prospective buyers can’t obtain financing or can’t obtain it on favorable terms,” says Andrew Bradley, president of global sales at Avjet Corporation. Bradley has even seen a bank require its client to buy a newer, significantly more expensive aircraft rather than provide financing for a slightly more than 10-year-old airplane of the same model. Indeed, relatively few business jets acquired last year were financed at all.
June 22, 2014
If two identical airplanes are priced the same and one of them has a damage history and the other doesn't, which one would you buy? (Illustration: John Lewis)
What’s the worst thing that can happen to your business jet? You might think the answer is an accident resulting in total loss, but it’s not. If a hangar roof collapses and destroys your aircraft, your insurance should enable you to replace it. On the other hand, if the airplane is only damaged in the incident, the insurer may opt to repair it, leaving you with a jet that operates just fine but has (gasp) damage history.
May 16, 2014
Click to enlarge image
When you’re evaluating the state of the used-aircraft market, you need to look at more than the percentage of the worldwide fleet that’s currently for sale. You have to investigate availability in a variety of geographical areas and model-year ranges.
March 26, 2014
The advantages of bonus depreciation are often over estimated, especially if an aircraft's availability for super-accelerated tax write-offs drives up the price.  (Illustration: John T. Lewis)
To start writing off your newly acquired jet for tax purposes in the U.S. you have to do more than buy it; you have to “place it in service” in your business. In recent years, the availability of “bonus” depreciation has only upped the ante on satisfying this Internal Revenue Service requirement.
March 14, 2014
For some jet models, demand now exceeds supply.
March 5, 2014
Illustration: Fotolia
Business jet finance has settled into a predictable—and more sustainable—groove after the mad scramble of 2007 and the deafening silence of
February 19, 2014
American Express Centurion Card
In exchange for annual fees of up to $7,500, they offer benefits that even ultra-high-net-worth customers are likely to appreciate.

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“You want to make sure with a race in which you'll be flying home with other drivers that you don't crash into them. It's happened before, and it can make for a little bit of a tense situation.”