Haute Cuisine: A Magical Paella

Business Jet Traveler » December 2012
Haute Cuisine: A Magical Paella
Haute Cuisine: A Magical Paella
Monday, January 28, 2013 - 12:15pm

Paella had its Western origin in Spain around the 10th century, when Moorish Muslims occupied much of the Iberian Peninsula and brought with them the cuisine of their native North Africa.

There are probably as many paella recipes today as there are chefs who make the dish, according to Amina Halim, owner and founder of JetFinity, a San Francisco-based business aviation caterer.

The paella prepared by JetFinity emphasizes wild seafood from local sources. The key to the frequently ordered entrée, said Halim, is the chef’s own seafood stock, which incorporates nearly 20 spices and requires some 16 hours of cooking over a low heat.

The seafood typically includes wild halibut, scallops, prawns, mussels and occasionally lobster, seared lightly and then simmered in the seafood stock with a bit of saffron. You may or may not leave your heart in San Francisco, but you’re bound to fall in love with this dish.

JetFinity, serving San Francisco-area airports. Info: www.jetfinity.com, 866-538-3464.

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““CEOs go to their vacation homes just after companies report favorable news, and CEOs return to headquarters right before subsequent news is released. More good news is released when CEOs are back at work, and CEOs appear not to leave headquarters at all if a firm has adverse news to disclose. When CEOs are away from the office, stock prices behave quietly with sharply lower volatility. Volatility increases immediately when CEOs return to work.” —David Yermack, a New York University finance professor, whose recently released study shows a correlation between when CEOs take their private jets on vacation and movements in their companies’ stock price ”

-David Yermack