Business Jet Traveler

August 31, 2015
It’s no wonder you don’t hear much negative talk about business aviation safety: there’s not much bad news to discuss. The safety record for private, charter and fractional business jets has long been by far the best of all of general aviation, which includes personal, training, sightseeing, utility and owner-flown turbine and non-turbine aircraft. Only the major airlines have a better long-term record. One reason is that they fly on regular schedules to the same destinations, so their pilots follow the same or similar routing, use the same airports and know what instructions to expect from air traffic controllers. Also, U.S. carriers operate under the most stringent federal aviation regulations. They must adhere to pilot duty-time limits and employ drug and alcohol testing, cockpit resource management, safety management systems and standard operations procedures.
August 30, 2015
Five and eight may be small numbers, but Airbus is betting they’ll represent a big difference for its new A350-900 XWB (extra wide body). The model is five inches wider and, claims the manufacturer, 8 percent more fuel-efficient than Boeing’s 787, with which it will compete in the long-haul, twinjet market. In 2018, Airbus expects to introduce a stretched version of the aircraft, the A350-1000, to go head-to-head with Boeing’s even larger 777 twinjet.
August 30, 2015
Hands holding piggy bank
How should you talk to your kids about money? All parents face the question of how to raise financially literate and responsible children, but affluent families encounter special challenges. The key is starting early—perhaps even as soon as when your child receives his first tooth-fairy dollars.
August 20, 2015
The latest products for your aircraft can mean faster Internet connections…and clean dinnerware.
August 9, 2015
Man in front of bee hives
At a growing number of big-city hotels, the buzz about locally produced food is now more literal: resident bees circling back to rooftop apiaries. Chefs who don protective suits and gloves tend the hives, whose honey has become a popular menu ingredient in restaurants merely floors below.
August 9, 2015
A wounded war vet and an inmate with a dog from Puppies Behind Bars.
Puppies Behind Bars trains prison inmates to raise service dogs.
July 29, 2015
Barefoot, my pants legs rolled up to my knees, I survey the horizon of mud, sea, birds and crystal-blue skies before focusing on biologist Heike Niemann as she scoops tiny snails into a screened colander. “Living in these sand grains are more than 800 species,” she says.
July 27, 2015
Paul Anka at piano
The singer-songwriter—still going strong nearly 60 years after his first hit—discusses his craft, explains why he’ll never retire and recalls how a bizjet helped him fill a concert request from Vladimir Putin. Singer/songwriter Paul Anka admits that he may have been the unlikeliest of pop stars when he burst onto the musical stage in the 1950s. “I was short, stocky, had a big nose and was far from the mold of the matinee-idol type,” says the artist, who turned 74 in July. But what he may have lacked in looks, he made up in talent.
July 27, 2015
people on static
I’m delighted to report that this issue introduces two new columnists to Business Jet Traveler. You’re probably already familiar with Joe Sharkey, a BJT contributor since 2005, whose New York Times business travel column has reached millions of readers every week for the past 16 years. Joe was on assignment for us in 2006 when the Embraer Legacy 600 he was riding on collided with a Brazilian airliner and had to make an emergency landing in the Amazon. (Read his harrowing account of the accident here.) Joe’s first bimonthly column for BJT concerns the end of the Mad Men era and the beginning of the business jet age.
July 27, 2015
True airspeed indicator
My friend Hugh has a highly developed scientific mind, and when he sees something about aviation that piques his interest, he often calls me for details. One question—“How fast is it?”—seems as if it ought to be pretty simple, but my answers often leave him frustrated. How can speed be so complicated?




“"My model for business is the Beatles. They were four guys who kept each other’s kind of negative tendencies in check. They balanced each other, and the total was greater than the sum of the parts. That’s how I see business: great things in business are never done by one person, they’re done by a team." ”

-Steve Jobs